Vata-Pacifying Recipe: Simple Split Mung Dal | Banyan Botanicals

Supporting Your Ayurvedic Lifestyle

 

Simple Split Mung Dal

posted in Recipes & DIY
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Vata Pacifying Diet

Vata is balanced by a diet of freshly cooked, whole foods that are soft or mushy in texture, rich in protein and fat, seasoned with a variety of warming spices, and served warm or hot. These foods calm vata by lubricating and nourishing the tissues, preserving moisture, and maintaining warmth, all while supporting proper digestion and elimination. Continue Reading >

Sometimes, on a cold and windy day, all I want to eat is something simple and soothing. Not only that, I don’t want to spend a long time in the kitchen. I just want to cozy up on the couch next to a fire and relax.

This recipe allows you to do just that. It’s super simple and easy to make. When made in a pressure cooker it takes about twenty minutes, tops (and that includes the prep!). When cooking in a pot, it takes about 30–40 minutes.  

The best part about this whole thing is that it is great for this time of year. It’s simple to digest, so easy on the agni, plus the nourishing and grounding qualities of mung dal makes it great for both vata and kapha. The heating spices in the dal will also help with calming both vata and kapha, while helping ignite your agni for an even smoother digestion.

Enjoy making this super quick, but super yummy dal!

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup split mung beans
  • 2 cups of water for pressure cooker, 3 cups of water for pot
  • 3 teaspoons grated ginger
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 2 teaspoons coriander/cumin powder blend
  • handful of chopped greens of your choice (spinach, kale, chard, etc.)
  • ½ lime squeezed
  • Salt to taste

Directions for a Pressure Cooker:

Rinse your split mung beans well under warm water (I generally go for 3 rinses total). Place in a pressure cooker with 2 cups water. Cook the split mung beans for about 3-4 releases of the pressure regulator. Turn off the stove, and allow for all of the pressure to be released.

Once it is safe to open your pressure cooker, open the lid. Your split mung beans should look well-cooked, almost mushy. Mix well with a spoon, and add water as needed. You can make it as thin or as thick as you like it.

Add all of the spices (ginger, turmeric, coriander/cumin, and salt), mixing well.

Turn the stove back on with the lid off, and toss in your greens. Stir in well, and cook until your dal is at a slow boil. This will help ensure that your greens are cooked well and that the spices have been incorporated properly.

Top off with some lime and salt to taste.

Enjoy over basmati rice or plain by itself!

Directions for a Pot:

Rinse your split mung beans well under warm water (I generally go for 3 rinses total). Place split mung beans in a pot with the 3 cups water along with all of the spices (ginger, turmeric, coriander/cumin, and salt). Once it starts to boil, turn heat down to a low simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for about 30 minutes. For easier digestion, skim the froth off the top of the dal as it cooks and discard. Add water as needed for desired consistency. Your mung beans should look well-cooked, almost mushy. You can make it as thin or as thick as you like it.

Toss in your greens and cook for another 10 minutes or until your greens are cooked well.

Top off with some lime and salt to taste.

Enjoy over basmati rice or plain by itself!

 

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